Cherokee Heritage Center

The Center consists of a living history Cherokee village, a museum, and small township of historical buildings. Dedicated to the perservation of Cherokee culture and history, it is one of the most widely visited Native American sites in Oklahoma.

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Monday, November 07, 2005


In Memory of Cherokee Artist Talmadge Davis

Talmadge Davis was an award winning artist whose paintings evoked powerful emotions and deep appreciation for his artwork. The preservation of Cherokee heritage and its ancient history was one of the driving forces behind his art. Davis exhibited his paintings as a part of the annual art shows at the Cherokee Heritage Center since 2000. Originally born in Oklahoma, Talmadge served in the US Army from 1982-1987 including serving in Germany. Talmadge won many awards throughout the country for his art including: Tulsa Indian Festival, Wichita Indian Market, Southwest Classic Art Show and a multiple winner for Best in Category and Peoples Choice at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

The Staff and Board of Trustees of the Cherokee National Historical Society, Inc., would like to pass along our thoughts and prayers to Talmadge’s family and friends. We will miss his charming personality and exquisite artwork.

Monday, October 17, 2005

Cherokee Heritage Center Receives Top Honors at Governor’s Conference



The Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill, Okla., received two Redbud Awards and a Merit award during the Governor’s Conference on Tourism held in Tulsa October 2-4. The center was awarded a Redbud for Best Sponsorship/Partnership, a Redbud for Best Web Site and a Merit award for Outstanding Temporary Exhibit for the Cherokee Athletes Exhibit displayed in January.

The Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department and the Oklahoma Travel Industry Association host the annual Redbud Awards, honoring excellence in tourism attractions, events and promotional efforts across the state. These awards represent the highest honor given for tourism in the state of Oklahoma.

The Best Sponsorship/Partnership category was judged on significant expansion of advertising or promotion budget due to sponsorships or cooperative efforts, creativity in soliciting sponsorship dollars and effective use of sponsorship dollars. The Cherokee Heritage Center won for its partnership with Cherokee Nation Enterprises on the production of a full-color informational magazine, “Cherokee Adventures,” designed to lure tourists to the entire Cherokee Nation.

The Best Web Site category was judged on ease of use, creativity, visual appeal, appropriateness for target audience, site effectiveness and achievement of goals. The Cherokee Heritage Center site, https://mail.cherokeeheritage.org/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.cherokeeheritage.org/, recently underwent a re-design in cooperation with the Information Systems department of the Cherokee Nation.

Each category offers only two awards, a Merit award and a Redbud. The Cherokee Heritage Center’s Cherokee Athlete’s exhibit received a Merit award for Outstanding Temporary Exhibit. This category was judged on creative and unique elements, marketing, publications and improvements or enhancements made to exhibits since initial display.

“We are honored to have been recognized by our peers in the industry and by the State of Oklahoma,” said Cherokee Heritage Center Public Relations Officer, Ami Maddocks. “The support we have received from the Cherokee Nation, Cherokee Nation Enterprises and the community is appreciated by everyone here at the center.”

The Cherokee Heritage Center is a nonprofit organization devoted to the preservation and promotion of Cherokee history and culture. The center is home to the Ancient Village, Adams Corner Rural Village, the Cherokee National Museum and the Tsa La Gi Amphitheater. For more information on the Cherokee Heritage Center’s events and attractions, call (918) 456-6007 or visit the Web site at https://mail.cherokeeheritage.org/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://www.cherokeeheritage.org/.

Students Relive Cherokee History at Ancient Cherokee Days



Hundreds of students recently had the opportunity to become part of Cherokee history during Ancient Cherokee Days, Oct. 13 and 14 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. Designed for Kindergarten through 12th grade students, Ancient Cherokee Days provides an excellent venue for a school field trip that is both educational and entertaining.

This children’s festival, sponsored by the Flint Foundation, gave children the opportunity to experience Cherokee life in the 1500s.

“Events such as Ancient Cherokee Days and Indian Territory Days, offered in the Spring, give children a better sense of Cherokee culture and expand beyond the Trail of Tears story,” said Cherokee Heritage Center Education Director, Tonia Hogner-Weavel. “It is a great way for students to experience the rich history, but most importantly to see Cherokee culture alive and
thriving in today’s world.”

Participants of Ancient Cherokee had the opportunity to participate in cultural activities such as blowgun shooting, stickball, chunkey, Cherokee language, Southeastern art projects and storytelling.

In addition to these events, students took advantage of the many permanent features at the Cherokee Heritage Center, including the Ancient Village, Adam’s Corner Rural Village, Heritage Farm, the Cherokee National Museum and the Museum Store.

Cherokee Homecoming Art Show Winners Announced



The winners of the Tenth Annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show and Sale were announced at a 12 p.m. awards ceremony Saturday, Oct. 8 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. Sponsored by Cherokee Nation Enterprises, the Oklahoma Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts, 49 artists from across the nation competed in various categories for more than $5,000 in cash awards.

First prize was given in each division as well as a Grand Prize award. In addition to these awards, five Judge’s Choice Awards and 15 Honorable Mention’s were given. This year’s Grand Prize winner is Jane Osti for her contemporary pot “Arkansas Appliqué.”

Divisions and categories for the show include: Traditional Division - 1. Traditional Basketry, 2. Jewelry and Beading, 3. Traditional Pottery, 4. Traditional Arts; Contemporary Division – 5. Visual Arts (Painting and Graphics), 6. Contemporary Sculpture, 7. Contemporary Pottery, 8. Contemporary Basketry and 9. Textiles.

Unlike the annual Trail of Tears Art Show, the homecoming show is only open to artists who have membership in the Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band of Cherokees. This distinction offers visitors the opportunity to purchase traditional Cherokee works.

Entered art work may be viewed on-line at http://www.cherokeeheritage.org/. For more information call the Cherokee Heritage Center at (918) 456-6007 or toll free at (888) 999-6007.

2005 Cherokee Homecoming Art Show Winners


Grand Prize Winner
Jane Osti – Arkansas Appliqué”

First Place – Traditional Division
Traditional Baskets

Bessie Russell – Famine Wheel

Traditional Jewelry & Beading
Martha Berry – After the Storm

Traditional Pottery
Lisa Rutherford – Nv-da Ga-sa-qua-lu

Traditional Arts
Dave Blackbird Jr. – Family Gatherings

First Place - Contemporary Division
Visual Arts
Virginia Stroud – Surrounded by Beauty

Contemporary Sculpture
William Demos Glass – Spider’s Journey

Contemporary Pottery
P.J. Gilliam Stewart – Starry Night by the Water

Contemporary Baskets
Lena Blackbird – Indian Summer

Textiles
Julie Perkins – Nvki

Judges Choice Awards
Shawna Morton Cain – Unfinished Business, A Peace Wampum
Abraham Locust – Beaded Cane
Virginia Stroud – Baby Bonnet Beaded
Carlene Wiley – Black Beauty
Joe Scott Jr. – War Club

Honorable Mentions
Bill Rabbit – The Elders
Lisa Rutherford – A Tsi Di
Kathy Van Buskirk – Fall
Sharon Irla – Serpentine Birds
Darrell Bollin – Ivory Billed Woodpecker
Judith Emerson – Into the Light
Jacque Young – Where the East Wind Blows
Valerie Blea – Small Pack Basket
America Meredith – Double Eagle
Tonia Hogner-Weavel – For Thelma
Mary Beth Nelson – Corn Woman
P.J. Gilliam Stewart – Thunder Boys
Roger Cain – Booger Mask
Jacque Young – Talking PentaclesShirley Sims – My Wild Pink Rose

Friday, August 26, 2005

Center Seeks New Executive Director

Cherokee National Historical Society, Inc.
dba The Cherokee Heritage Center
P. O. Box 515
Tahlequah, OK 74465
(918) 456-6007
e-mail: info@cherokeeheritage.org

JOB ANNOUNCEMENT

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Cherokee National Historical Society, Inc. (CNHS) is searching for an Executive Director. The successful applicant will have the following qualifications:
A broad knowledge of the history and culture of the Cherokee people and sensitivity to issues concerning the Cherokees and other Native American tribes.

Masters Degree in Liberal Arts with a Cherokee or American Indian concentration and/or museum management or related fields of study with American Indian/Cherokee concentration.

Five Years’ experience in successful management and supervising at least 30 employees with appropriate knowledge of personnel law and policies.

Must be able to communicate well; facilitate staff; work with designers, architects and contractors; co-ordinate an effective and aggressive development campaign which includes funding from tribal, federal and state governments, and corporate and individual donors; oversee expansion of educational opportunities, including distance learning; promote traditional and contemporary arts; and work co-operatively with other museums, tribal, inter-tribal, regional, state, national and international tourism groups to most effectively market the Heritage Center.

Should be able to read and report on financial statements.

CNHS, a 501(c)(3) membership organization, operates the Cherokee Heritage Center (CHC) – 44 beautiful acres south of Tahlequah, OK, the capitol of the Cherokee Nation. The Cherokee Heritage Center includes a living history ancient village, an 1890s Cherokee Nation town and farm, an amphitheatre, a chapel and the Cherokee National Museum which contains exhibits, a museum store, the Cherokee Family Research Center (genealogy library), and houses the National Archives of the Cherokee Nation. The CHC has a growing program of educational opportunities.

The Executive Director is the chief executive officer, authorized by and reporting to the Board of Trustees, and must understand and articulate the purposes of the Society to preserve and promote Cherokee history, traditions and culture and the Society’s goal of becoming the best and most visited tribally specific educational center in the world; have an excellent understanding of Cherokee culture, language and traditions; and the ability to present and interpret Cherokee culture for Cherokee people, as well as the general public, and possess a full knowledge of the strategic planning process. The salary range is $60,000 to $70,000, with benefits.

Interested candidates should e-mail a resume and cover letter. The letter should state the reasons the candidate is interested in this position, include a summary of relevant qualifications and salary requirements. Applications should be sent to info@cherokeeheritage.org

Friday, August 12, 2005

Grove Fall Festival

Lee Brashear, Chamber of Commerce, Grove, Oklahoma called to ask us for help getting the word out that they are sponsoring a Fall Festival:

October 15, 2005. Place: Grove upper elementary school.

No booth cost to artist or craftspeople. There is a cost for food vendors. Ms. Brashear is looking for demonstration people to: Like basket makers or story tellers, musicians, etc.

She can be contacted at: cell no. 918-373-3375 or at fax no. 918-479-2837

You may also contact the Grove Chamber of Commerce President, John Taylor (he is also the Chief of Police) at this number: 918-479-8121.

Please send her contact information for artist or let the artist / crafters / etc. that you know about this opportunity.

Wado

Roy

More Heritage Center News

August 10, 2005, Cherokee Artist Wins Prestigious Award

Victoria Mitchell Vazquez, Oklahoma Cherokee potter, recently received a fellowship award as visiting artist to the “Native Arts Program” from Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. In August 2005, she will travel to Washington D.C., New York, Philadelphia and Boston to research their museum collections. Her area of study will include the pottery, artifacts and culture from the time periods of Woodland Culture, 1000 B.C. – A.D., the Mississippi Culture, 1000 – 1600 A.D. and Historic Culture, 1500 – 1800. Click here for more.

August 10, 2005, Pottery Auction of a Lifetime!

Triple A Auctions has contracted with us to have a huge “Everything Goes” auction at the Pottery Plant in Porum on August 27, 2005. It is roughly scheduled for 10:00am. The auction is open to everyone. All items must go--molds, mixers, green ware and even the kilns!

August 10, 2005, More Heritage Center Happenings

Heritage Center artist Tonia Weavel will be doing a Cherokee clothing lecture for the Cherokee County Home Extension group on August 23, 10 a.m. at the community building. It’s open to their membership. Kathryn has new t shirt designs in the museum store-- Tribal Tagz, Tiger and new CHC shirts galore. Kathy VanBuskirk will be teaching a round reed basket class September 17. Fee is $30 and pre registration is recommended.

August 10, 2005, Development Office Doings

Interim Development Director and Membership Director Wil Lowe talked to Kyle Smith from the RedWind Group. Inc. in Houston, TX about strategic planning activies for the Cherokee Heritage Center. Kyle is well-known for his work with Native American groups and planning. Wil will also attend a grant research seminar in Tulsa through the Oklahoma Center for Non-profits. Abigayle Tobia, formerly of Price Tower in Bartlesville, has accepted the Development Director position and will start September 5th. Welcome, Abigayle!

August 10, 2005, Artists and Crafters Helping the Center

North Carolina artist Betty McCullen is sending items she has made to the Heritage Center, like masks, arts, and crafts items to donate to the museum store. This will benefit the Cherokee Heritage Center. If you would like to donate new, Cherokee-related items instead of money to help benefit the Cherokee Heritage Center, please contact Kathy VanBuskirk at 888-999-6007.

August 10, 2005, Traditional Clothing Exhibit

We are proud to have on display Heritage center employee and artist Tonia Weavel’s exhibit of Cherokee clothing. Tonia mentored with Cherokee artist Wendell Cochran. The mentor program is made possible through the Cherokee Nation to pass along traditional arts and crafts from generation to generation. The Cherokee Heritage Center is proud to have staff who have participated in this program for many years. Tonia’s exhibit will be up through Cherokee Holiday. Again we congratulate her and Mr. Cochran on a wonderful job.

August 10, 2005, Flute Circle News

The last Flute Circle was a great success, with flute players and makers coming from Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. We were happy to have Cherokee flutemaker Jerry Fretwell come out and show everyone his wonderful flutes. Fretwell works with different woods and makes them in Missouri. The next Flute Circle will be August 19th from 7-9pm at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

We welcome everyone who plays, makes, or just has a curiosity about flutes. It's free for everyone. Also, check out our Museum Store for local flutemakers who create one-of-a-kind wood and rivercane flutes, including: Joyce Barnes, Darrel "Longhair" Bowin, Jerry Fretwell, Sonny Arm-in-Trout, and Tommy Wildcat.

Thursday, August 11, 2005

News from the Center

August 10, 2005, More Heritage Center Happenings

Heritage Center artist Tonia Weavel will be doing a Cherokee clothing lecture for the Cherokee County Home Extension group on August 23, 10 a.m. at the community building. It’s open to their membership. Kathryn has new t shirt designs in the museum store-- Tribal Tagz, Tiger and new CHC shirts galore. Kathy VanBuskirk will be teaching a round reed basket class September 17. Fee is $30 and pre registration is recommended.

August 10, 2005, Development Office Doings

Interim Development Director and Membership Director Wil Lowe talked to Kyle Smith from the RedWind Group. Inc. in Houston, TX about strategic planning activies for the Cherokee Heritage Center. Kyle is well-known for his work with Native American groups and planning. Wil will also attend a grant research seminar in Tulsa through the Oklahoma Center for Non-profits. Abigayle Tobia, formerly of Price Tower in Bartlesville, has accepted the Development Director position and will start September 5th. Welcome, Abigayle!

August 10, 2005, Artists and Crafters Helping the Center

North Carolina artist Betty McCullen is sending items she has made to the Heritage Center, like masks, arts, and crafts items to donate to the museum store. This will benefit the Cherokee Heritage Center. If you would like to donate new, Cherokee-related items instead of money to help benefit the Cherokee Heritage Center, please contact Kathy VanBuskirk at 888-999-6007.

August 10, 2005, Traditional Clothing Exhibit

We are proud to have on display Heritage center employee and artist Tonia Weavel’s exhibit of Cherokee clothing. Tonia mentored with Cherokee artist Wendell Cochran. The mentor program is made possible through the Cherokee Nation to pass along traditional arts and crafts from generation to generation. The Cherokee Heritage Center is proud to have staff who have participated in this program for many years. Tonia’s exhibit will be up through Cherokee Holiday. Again we congratulate her and Mr. Cochran on a wonderful job.



August 10, 2005, Flute Circle News

The last Flute Circle was a great success, with flute players and makers coming from Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. We were happy to have Cherokee flutemaker Jerry Fretwell come out and show everyone his wonderful flutes. Fretwell works with different woods and makes them in Missouri. The next Flute Circle will be August 19th from 7-9pm at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

We welcome everyone who plays, makes, or just has a curiosity about flutes. It's free for everyone. Also, check out our Museum Store for local flutemakers who create one-of-a-kind wood and rivercane flutes, including: Joyce Barnes, Darrel "Longhair" Bowin, Jerry Fretwell, Sonny Arm-in-Trout, and Tommy Wildcat.



August 9, 2005, First Families Welcome New Members

When Austin Nash Dillon of Plano, Texas, decided to take a vacation with his grandparents, he had no idea he would end up sitting in the office of Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chad “Corntassel” Smith.

“It caught me off guard,” Dillon said. “They didn’t tell me we were doing this. It was very interesting to meet him.” Click here to read more.

August 8, 2005, New Team Member at the Heritage Center

We are pleased to announce a new team member at CHC, Lesa Rinehart, who has roots in this area, and recently moved back from Texas. Lesa will be the Group Tour Sales Coordinator. In other news, curator Mickel Yantz, archivist Tom Mooney, and Marketing Director Seth Davidson will be attending the Oklahoma Museums Association meeting. The Heritage Center has also sold out of food vendor spots for the CN Holiday, but have several arts and crafts spots remaining.

June 12, Julian Fite Memorial Fund

The board of trustees of the Cherokee National Historical Society, Inc. have established the Julian Fite Memorial Fund for the acquisition of materials and research into Cherokee law to be housed in the Cherokee National Archives.

Fite, general council for the Cherokee Nation, died June 2. He was also the vice president of the CNHS, the parent non-profit organization of the Cherokee Heritage Center. In response to the numerous contributions to Cherokee law made by Fite, the board decided the fund is an appropriate gesture to remember and honor Fite and the profession to which he dedicated his life. Click here for more information.

Thursday, August 04, 2005

First Families of the Cherokee Nation Welcomes New Members

When Austin Nash Dillon of Plano, Texas, decided to take a vacation with his grandparents, he had no idea he would end up sitting in the office of Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chad “Corntassel” Smith.

“It caught me off guard,” Dillon said. “They didn’t tell me we were doing this. It was very interesting to meet him.”

Dillon, a senior in high school and a member of his student-run school government, is very interested in learning about his Cherokee heritage.

“I think since it is my senior year, and especially before going to college, it is important for me to see where I come from,” said Dillon. “A large part of who I am goes back to my heritage.”

Chief Smith presented Dillon with a certificate to the First Families of the Cherokee Nation on behalf of the Cherokee Heritage Center.

“I’m working on our family genealogy,” said Dillon’s grandmother Wanda Dillon. “I joined the First Families and I wanted Austin and his sister to have their certificates as well.”

First Families of the Cherokee Nation is a unique organization operated by the Cherokee Heritage Center and its genealogy department, the Cherokee Family Research Center. It offers lifetime membership as a means of recognizing the early families who formed the Cherokee Nation. First Families is a heraldic society sponsored by the Cherokee National Historical Society Inc.

Gene Norris, CNHS genealogist, and a genealogy committee accept and approve applicants. Marjorie Lowe of Houston, Texas, a Cherokee historian, member of the FFCN and the Cherokee National Historical Society for many years, was instrumental in the formation of this organization and continues to support the society.

“We are pleased to have Austin and his family as members,” said genealogist Gene Norris. “It is always exciting when people show their appreciation and interest in their Cherokee ancestry. We currently have 610 members and counting.”

Membership in First Families is limited to those persons who can document their ancestor was a lawful resident of the Cherokee Nation, East or West, prior to the ratification of the Cherokee Nation Constitution on Sept., 6, 1839.

For more First Families information and applications, call the Cherokee Heritage Center’s genealogy department at (918) 456-6007, ext. 27 or send e-mails to genealogy@cherokeeheritage.org.

Thursday, July 28, 2005

Cherokee Heritage Center Hosts Russian Delegation

A delegation from Russia visited the Cherokee Heritage Center today to learn about our techniques for preserving and promoting Cherokee history and culture. Tulsa Global Alliance Program Director, Bob Lieser, said he brought this group of eight visitors to the Cherokee Heritage Center because they were interested in starting a similar site in Russia, or because they would like to learn how to better manage the site they currently have.

Our Russian guests enjoyed the various attractions at the Cherokee Heritage Center such as the Cherokee National Museum, Adams Corner Rural Village and the Tsa La Gi Ancient Village. They also spoke with Cherokee Heritage Center Curator Mickel Yantz, Director Richard A. Fields, and Education Director Tonia Hogner-Weavel. The group, made up of museum and preservation professionals, were very interested in learning more about Cherokee lifestyles stating they had heard bits and pieces from other people but wanted a first-hand experience of Cherokee daily life.

The Cherokee Heritage Center frequently welcomes visitors from around the world and would like to thank the Tulsa Global Alliance for their continued support.


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